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Hair Fall: Causes, Treatments, and Everything Else You Need to Know

hair

It’s normal to lose some hair every day. Seeing a few strands left in the drain after a vigorous shampooing session is no reason to panic. After all, hair grows in cycles, so what is shed is usually quickly replaced!

The average hair fall rate in humans is around 70-100 strands a day. If your hair is falling out at a higher rate than this—or if you’ve suddenly gone from a normal to accelerated hair fall rate—then it may be some cause of concern.

To give you an idea, here are some common causes of hair loss and possible treatments:

1. Androgenetic alopecia

Male or female pattern baldness is one of the most common causes of hair loss.

Androgenetic alopecia can start at any point after puberty, but it’s most common for men and women of advanced age. Men tend to lose hair from the crown of the head down to the temples, while women’s hair becomes thinner all over the head. This condition progresses very slowly in both men and women—it spans several years to decades.

Treatment: Hormones trigger Androgenetic alopecia, so there is no cure. Topically administered hair tonic can enhance hair growth and slow hair loss.

2. Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune disease that causes hair to fall out in small, coin-sized patches. Most cases occur before the age of 30. It occurs spontaneously, often within just a few days. While it isn’t genetic or infectious, it can occur among family members.

Treatment: Spontaneous recovery is expected for those who lose only a few patches of hair. There is no direct cure for alopecia areata, so patients are prescribed multimodality treatment for hair re-growth.

3. Traction alopecia

Traction alopecia is hair loss due to the physical pulling of hair into tight hairstyles, causing the strands to break. Tight buns, cornrows, extensions, and braids are hairstyles that are commonly associated with this condition. A person with severe traction alopecia may develop bald spots and thinning hair.

Treatment: Avoiding tight hairstyles will prevent further damage.

4. Telogen effluvium

Telogen is a phase in the growth cycle of hair. It’s the natural shedding phase that occurs three years after growth. Typically, 10% of hair is in the telogen phase.

When something shocking or traumatic happens to our body (such as childbirth, serious illness, severe emotional stress, dramatic weight loss, surgery, certain thyroid conditions), it can cause as much as 30%-40% of your hair to cycle into the shedding phase spontaneously. Hair falls out not just in the shower, but on pillows, in the car, and through everyday activities. Fortunately, more dramatic hair loss means most of it will come back once the hair growth cycle stabilises.

Treatment: There is no treatment for telogen effluvium because it resolves itself over time. Treatment will likely be needed for underlying causes. A doctor will switch your medication if it’s causing hair loss.

5. Anagen effluvium

Anagen is the growing phase in the hair cycle. Anagen effluvium even affects eyebrows and eyelashes. Causes include chemotherapy, radiation, autoimmune diseases, and fungal infections.

It’s normal to lose some hair every day. Seeing a few strands left in the drain after a vigorous shampooing session is no reason to panic. After all, hair grows in cycles, so what is shed is usually quickly replaced!

The average hair fall rate in humans is around 70-100 strands a day. If your hair is falling out at a higher rate than this—or if you’ve suddenly gone from a normal to accelerated hair fall rate—then it may be some cause of concern.

To give you an idea, here are some common causes of hair loss and possible treatments:

  

1. Androgenetic alopecia

Male or female pattern baldness is one of the most common causes of hair loss.

Androgenetic alopecia can start at any point after puberty, but it’s most common for men and women of advanced age. Men tend to lose hair from the crown of the head down to the temples, while women’s hair becomes thinner all over the head. This condition progresses very slowly in both men and women—it spans several years to decades.

Treatment: Hormones trigger Androgenetic alopecia, so there is no cure. Topically administered hair tonic can enhance hair growth and slow hair loss.

  

2. Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune disease that causes hair to fall out in small, coin-sized patches. Most cases occur before the age of 30. It occurs spontaneously, often within just a few days. While it isn’t genetic or infectious, it can occur among family members.

Treatment: Spontaneous recovery is expected for those who lose only a few patches of hair. There is no direct cure for alopecia areata, so patients are prescribed multimodality treatment for hair re-growth.

3. Traction alopecia

Traction alopecia is hair loss due to the physical pulling of hair into tight hairstyles, causing the strands to break. Tight buns, cornrows, extensions, and braids are hairstyles that are commonly associated with this condition. A person with severe traction alopecia may develop bald spots and thinning hair.

Treatment: Avoiding tight hairstyles will prevent further damage.

4. Telogen effluvium

Telogen is a phase in the growth cycle of hair. It’s the natural shedding phase that occurs three years after growth. Typically, 10% of hair is in the telogen phase.

When something shocking or traumatic happens to our body (such as childbirth, serious illness, severe emotional stress, dramatic weight loss, surgery, certain thyroid conditions), it can cause as much as 30%-40% of your hair to cycle into the shedding phase spontaneously. Hair falls out not just in the shower, but on pillows, in the car, and through everyday activities. Fortunately, more dramatic hair loss means most of it will come back once the hair growth cycle stabilises.

Treatment: There is no treatment for telogen effluvium because it resolves itself over time. Treatment will likely be needed for underlying causes. A doctor will switch your medication if it’s causing hair loss.

5. Anagen effluvium

Anagen is the growing phase in the hair cycle. Anagen effluvium even affects eyebrows and eyelashes. Causes include chemotherapy, radiation, autoimmune diseases, and fungal infections.

Treatment: Hair that’s lost during chemotherapy or radiation usually grows back 3-6 months after stopping treatment. In the meantime, it’s best to use organic shampoos on the scalp and avoid heavy lotions or scalp-stimulating products.

Conclusion

Everyone sheds a certain amount of hair every day, but it can be a cause for concern if you think you’re losing more hair than you should. Common reasons for hair loss include autoimmune disease, chemotherapy treatments, drastic changes in our body, and tight hairstyles. It’s important to determine the underlying cause before you go in for treatment.

Are you experiencing unnatural hair loss and want to consult with a professional near you? Cleo Clinic provides hair loss treatments, as well as many other medically proven aesthetic procedures. Schedule a free consultation today!

Hair that’s lost during chemotherapy or radiation usually grows back 3-6 months after stopping treatment. In the meantime, it’s best to use organic shampoos on the scalp and avoid heavy lotions or scalp-stimulating products.

Conclusion

Everyone sheds a certain amount of hair every day, but it can be a cause for concern if you think you’re losing more hair than you should. Common reasons for hair loss include autoimmune disease, chemotherapy treatments, drastic changes in our body, and tight hairstyles. It’s important to determine the underlying cause before you go in for treatment.

Are you experiencing unnatural hair loss and want to consult with a professional near you? Cleo Clinic provides hair loss treatments, as well as many other medically proven aesthetic procedures. Schedule a free consultation today!

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